On this date…16th January 1934

The Swansea Little Theatre began their five night run of performances at Southend, Mumbles, of their latest undertaking, the 18th Century William Congreve comedy, The Way of the World.

Dylan played the part of the foolish young Witwoud. The programme however, listed him as ‘Dilyn’ Thomas.

1507211_891213700910476_4418628949658560346_n.jpg

Mrs. Evelyn Burman a fellow cast mate of Dylan’s at the Little Theatre recalled Dylan’s impromptu trips to the ‘Prince of Wales’ pub or ‘Cheeses’ as it was known locally due to the owner being one Mr. Cheddar. She said…

‘In 1934 I played the very minor role of Mincing..woman to Mrs. Millamant in The Way of the World and as Dylan was Witwoud, a follower of Mrs. Millamant, it meant that we were often waiting in the wings. He would say to me ‘Mincing! I’m mincing off’ (the pub was less than two minutes from the theatre.)

She went on to say,

‘he never failed to appear ready for his next entry’ by all accounts Dylan was a burgeoning great actor and could hold his audience in a transfixed state.’

Of the performances of this Congreve play Evelyn recounted,

‘One of his (Dylan’s) lines, ‘Gad, I have forgot what I was about to say to you’ he used more than once to cover up a whirlwind entry until he composed himself.’

Take a look at our website www.dylanthomasbirthplace.com for details on how you can create your own unique experiences including tours, overnight stays and dining experiences at the home of Dylan Thomas, Wales’ most renowned writer!

Advertisements

On this date…14th January 1927

12 year old D.M. Thomas of Swansea had a poem entitled His Requiem published in Wales’ national newspaper, the Western Mail.

Nearly 45 years later it was discovered that he had cribbed the verse from one of his favourite boyhood reads The Boy’s Own Paper of November 1923. Had the act been committed for mere devilment? More likely it had been an attempt by the young boy with aspirations of becoming a poet, to gain the approval from his parents which he so craved.

10906216_889850147713498_1514193949341084911_n

The paper would send the Thomases a postal order of 10 shillings as payment but Dylan’s parents were so proud of their son’s achievement that it was never spent.

In 1971, upon publication of Dylan Thomas: The Poems (edited by Dylan’s great friend Daniel Jones) a keen eyed reader by the name of Mr. Richard Parker of London alerted The Sunday Telegraph to this poem which featured in the book’s Early Poems section. It seems that Mr. Parker had a very good memory and remembered His Requiem being published by a Miss Lillian Gard, a regular contributor of poems and stories to the Boy’s Own Paper in the 1920s.

As a result, Daniel Jones book at first carried a publisher’s note acknowledging the new finding and then the poem was removed in later editions.

Take a look at our website www.dylanthomasbirthplace.com for details on how you can create your own unique experiences including tours, overnight stays and dining experiences at the home of Dylan Thomas, Wales’ most renowned writer!

On this date…12th January 1935

An in depth review of Dylan’s 18 Poems appeared in the Herald of Wales newpaper. Reviewer, A. Spencer Vaughan-Thomas B.A. (Oxon) wrote…

‘No one can read his work without feeling that here is a poet magnificently equipped to achieve great things.’

10897778_888704311161415_6093932994348075769_n

Take a look at our website www.dylanthomasbirthplace.com for details on how you can create your own unique experiences including tours, overnight stays and dining experiences at the home of Dylan Thomas, Wales’ most renowned writer!

On this date…11th January 1935

A highly complimentary review of Dylan’s first published book Eighteen Poems appeared in The Swansea Review section of the Swansea & West Wales Guardian newspaper.
This seems to be the first instance where the book was reviewed in a Welsh periodical.

The reviewer, “20th CENTURY” says of Dylan…

‘Modern poets fall into two categories, those who are the creatures of their age, and those who are it’s creators. In the latter group we find Auden, Spender and Dylan Thomas. It is a fault of both Auden and Spender, that having perfected their technique as poets, they strain themselves to become perfect media for propaganda. Dylan Thomas is too much the artist to allow politics to bemuse his muse. One knows instinctively his politics are correct, but they hover like a faint perfume above the lines of his poetry; they neither intrude or obtrude.’

He closes with…

‘Mr. Thomas is doing with poetry much the same as James Joyce did with prose. He is making a new language, not a Joyce did by making numerous languages to produce an illegitimate literary off-spring, but hammering new meaning into old worlds and phrases; crowning backs with the alchemy of his essentially poetic imagination.

10931557_887879787910534_6249474668869346846_n

Take a look at our website www.dylanthomasbirthplace.com for details on how you can create your own unique experiences including tours, overnight stays and dining experiences at the home of Dylan Thomas, Wales’ most renowned writer!

 

On this date…10th January 1935

An advert in the South Wales Evening Post gives mention that the first book of poems by Swansea’s Dylan Thomas entitled 18 Poems, will be reviewed in its sister paper the Herald of Wales.

12507184_1077066895658488_8012643315389791820_n

Take a look at our website www.dylanthomasbirthplace.com for details on how you can create your own unique experiences including tours, overnight stays and dining experiences at the home of Dylan Thomas, Wales’ most renowned writer!